Mortensen Bach

Concerto Copenhagen, Lars Ulrik Mortensen, Soloists - Johann Sebastian Bach: Mass in B minor (2015) 2 CDs

Johann Sebastian Bach - Mass in B minor (2015) 2 CDs
Maria Keohane, Joanne Lunn, Alex Potter, Jan Kobow, Peter Harvey
Concerto Copenhagen, conducted by Lars Ulrik Mortensen

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 511 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 252 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans ~ 84 Mb
Genre: Classical | Label: CPO | # cpo 777 851-2 | Time: 01:43:32

The sound world of Bach’s last great Mass has changed radically in recent decades; one-to-a-part performance practice is, as conductor Lars Ulrik Mortensen puts it, “changing our entire notion of Bach’s acoustic universe”. This bold claim is amply proven in an account of dazzling transparency, dance-like rhythms and utter clarity. Sometimes the balance seems not quite right, for example when organ continuo dominates, but some superb ensemble numbers pit voices against virtuosic instruments so each seems to outdo the other in joyous exuberance. The five soloists complement each other well, and the addition of just five extra singers is all that is needed to explode Bach’s universal vision into life.
John Holloway, Jaap ter Linden, Lars Ulrik Mortensen - Francesco Maria Veracini: Sonatas (2005)

John Holloway, Jaap ter Linden, Lars Ulrik Mortensen - Francesco Maria Veracini: Sonatas (2005)
EAC | FLAC (image+.cue, log) | Covers Included | 60:01 | 372 MB
Genre: Classical | Label: ECM New Series | Catalog: ECM 1889

After decades during which the unaccompanied violin sonatas and partitas of Bach stood alone, regarded by all but specialists as rather freakish musical occurrences, recent years have seen a growth of interest in the virtuoso violin repertory of the Baroque. Composers like Biber, Pisendel, and Tartini have all shown up with increasing frequency on concert programs and recordings.
European Union Baroque Orchestra, Lars Ulrik Mortensen - Baroque Suites (2008)

European Union Baroque Orchestra, Lars Ulrik Mortensen - Baroque Suites (2008)
EAC | FLAC (image+.cue, log) | Covers Included | 52:30 | 297 MB
Genre: Classical | Label: The Gift Of Music | Catalog: CCL CDG1211

Lars Ulrik Mortensen is best known as a harpsichordist active largely in Baroque solo and chamber music repertory. But his career is quite multifaceted: he has regularly conducted both instrumental and operatic works and has taught harpsichord and historic performance practices at the Hochschule fur Musik in Munich. He has often appeared in concert as accompanist to singer Emma Kirkby and has regularly partnered violinist John Holloway and cellist Jaap ter Linden.
John Holloway, Jaap Ter Linden, Lars Ulrik Mortensen - Dietrich Buxtehude: Complete Chamber Music, Vol.1 (1994)

John Holloway, Jaap Ter Linden, Lars Ulrik Mortensen - Dietrich Buxtehude: Complete Chamber Music, Vol.1 (1994)
EAC | APE (image+.cue, log) | Covers Included | 57:27 | 390 MB
Genre: Classical | Label: Dacapo | Catalog: 8 224003

Dietrich Buxtehude is probably most familiar to modern classical music audiences as the man who inspired the young Johann Sebastian Bach to make a lengthy pilgrimage to Lubeck, Buxtehude's place of employment and residence for most of his life, just to hear Buxtehude play the organ. But Buxtehude was a major figure among German Baroque composers in his own right.

Brad Mehldau - After Bach (2018)  Music

Posted by Designol at March 31, 2018
Brad Mehldau - After Bach (2018)

Brad Mehldau - After Bach (2018)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 269 Mb | Scans included
Label: Nonesuch Records | # 7559-79318-0 | Time: 01:09:22
Contemporary Jazz, Modern Creative, Classical Crossover

No composer looms over modern jazz quite like Johann Sebastian Bach, whose harmonic rigour seems to have provided the basis for bebop and all that followed. Listen to the endlessly mutating semiquavers tumbling from Charlie Parker’s saxophone and it could be the top line of a Bach fantasia; the jolting cycle of chords in John Coltrane’s Giant Steps could come straight from a Bach fugue and Bach’s contrapuntal techniques crop up in countless jazz pianists, from Bill Evans to Nina Simone. Bach certainly casts a long shadow over US pianist Brad Mehldau: even when he’s gently mutilating pieces by Radiohead, Nick Drake or the Beatles, he sounds like Glenn Gould ripping into the Goldberg Variations. Which is why it comes as no surprise to see Mehldau recording an entire album inspired by Bach. However, this is not a jazz album. Instead of riffing on Bach themes, as the likes of Jacques Loussier or the Modern Jazz Quartet have done in the past, After Bach sees Mehldau using Bach’s methodology. Mehldau plays five of Bach’s canonic 48 Preludes and Fugues, each followed by his own modern 21st-century response.
Lars Ulrik Mortensen, Concerto Copenhagen, Inger Dam-Jensen, Andreas Scholl - Handel: Partenope (2009)

Lars Ulrik Mortensen, Concerto Copenhagen, Inger Dam-Jensen, Andreas Scholl - Handel: Partenope (2009)
NTSC 16:9 (720x480) | Italiano (LinearPCM, 2 ch) | (DTS, 5 ch) | 187 min | 4.87+6.73 Gb (2xDVD9)
Classical | Label: DECCA | Sub: English, Francais, Deutsch, Italiano, Espanol, Dansk | Recorded: 2008

Mortensen's magnificent direction brings out the full measure of excitement, pathos and emotion in Handel's score…[the production] conveys an enormous amount of what makes Partenope very special.
–Gramophone
John Holloway, Jaap Ter Linden, Lars Ulrik Mortensen - Buxtehude: Complete Chamber Music, Vol.2 (1995)

John Holloway, Jaap Ter Linden, Lars Ulrik Mortensen - Buxtehude: Complete Chamber Music, Vol.2 (1995)
EAC | FLAC (image+.cue, log) | Covers Included | 63:08 | 429 MB
Genre: Classical | Label: Marco Polo | Catalog: 8.224004

It's hard to believe this CD was done with only a violin, viola da gama and harpsichord. This is polyphonic music at its finest. It does tribute to Buxtehude, who preceded Bach. The ensemble is perfect - the instruments complement each other. When they go from slow to fast, it is remarkable to hear the contrast. These are expert musicians with a complete mastery of their instruments. They use loud-soft as easily as any masters of the Baroque. The result is joyous, lively and entertaining.
Concerto Copenhagen, Danish National Vocal Ensemble & Lars Ulrik Mortensen - Gade: Erlkönigs Tochter (2018)

Concerto Copenhagen, Danish National Vocal Ensemble & Lars Ulrik Mortensen - Gade: Erlkönigs Tochter (2018)
Classical, Vocal | WEB FLAC (tracks) & d. booklet | 187 MB
Label: Dacapo | Tracks: 11 | Time: 42:29 min

Elverskud (The Elf-King's Daughter) is a dramatic cantata from 1854, based on Danish medieval ballads. It became one of Niels W. Gade's greatest successes,not only in his native Denmark, but throughout Europe, where Elverskud was performed several hundred times, often conducted by Gade himself. Gade was especially admired in Germany, and on this album Elverskudis not only played on period instruments for the first time, but is also sung for the first time with the German text that brought the work international fame.

Harmony of Nations & Laurence Cummings - Bach Triples (2017)  Music

Posted by SERTiL at Dec. 22, 2017
Harmony of Nations & Laurence Cummings - Bach Triples (2017)

Harmony of Nations & Laurence Cummings - Bach Triples (2017)
Classical | WEB FLAC (tracks) & front cover | 449 MB
Label: Raumklang (edition raumklang) | Tracks: 17 | Time: 75:22 min

In many of his works, Bach made use of a hidden symbolism of numbers. The number “three” had a special meaning for Bach and was the basis for the triple concertos, the concertos for three solo instruments, recorded here. On the one hand, the number three had for Bach a Christian connotation; on the other hand, there were also entirely profane reasons. As an essential element of late-baroque texture, the “three” was reflected in the trio sonata, whose structure was the basis of numerous instrumental and vocal pieces.

Harmony of Nations & Laurence Cummings - Bach Triples (2017)  Music

Posted by Pisulik at Dec. 15, 2017
Harmony of Nations & Laurence Cummings - Bach Triples (2017)

Harmony of Nations & Laurence Cummings - Bach Triples (2017)
Classical | MP3 CBR 320 kbps | Digital Booklet | 01:15:29 | 178 MB
Label: Raumklang (edition raumklang)

In many of his works, Bach made use of a hidden symbolism of numbers. The number “three” had a special meaning for Bach and was the basis for the triple concertos, the concertos for three solo instruments, recorded here. On the one hand, the number three had for Bach a Christian connotation; on the other hand, there were also entirely profane reasons. As an essential element of late-baroque texture, the “three” was reflected in the trio sonata, whose structure was the basis of numerous instrumental and vocal pieces. Bach probably composed the Concerto for three harpsichords especially for two of his sons (and pupils), taking the third part himself. In the Third Brandenburg Concerto, the idea of three solo instruments is carried even further in that each of the three string groups – violins, violas, and violoncellos – have three independent parts.