Ehnes

James Ehnes - Walton: Viola Concerto, Sonata for String Orchestra & Partita for Orchestra (2018)

James Ehnes, Edward Gardner, BBC Symphony Orchestra - Walton: Viola Concerto, Sonata for String Orchestra & Partita for Orchestra (2018)
Classical | WEB FLAC (tracks) & d. booklet | 263 MB
Label: Chandos | Tracks: 10 | Time: 65:37 min

In this third volume of Edward Gardners Walton series with the BBC Symphony Orchestra, James Ehnes leaves his violin to tackle the taxing soloist role in the Viola Concerto. In a recent Strad interview, Ehnes confesses: This is a piece I have loved since I was a teenager, so it is wonderful that the opportunity has come my way to record it… With Waltons Viola Concerto, none of the writing is impossible but a lot of it is close.
James Ehnes, Andrew Armstrong & Sydney Symphony - Vivaldi: The Four Seasons (2015) [Official Digital Download 24/96]

James Ehnes, Andrew Armstrong & Sydney Symphony - Vivaldi: The Four Seasons (2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time - 71:01 minutes | 1.38 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Digital Booklet

James Ehnes takes a break from the 19th and 20th century repertoire and has recorded for the first time in his career four of the most famous baroque violin concertos – Vivaldi’s Four Seasons, the first four works in his set of 12, op8. James also directs the Sydney Symphony.
Seattle Chamber Music Society & James Ehnes - American Chamber Music (2014) [Official Digital Download 24/96]

Seattle Chamber Music Society & James Ehnes - American Chamber Music (2014)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time - 61:48 minutes | 1.08 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Digital Booklet

James Ehnes and friends from the Seattle Chamber Music Society hit the road on a fascinating journey through chamber music by some of the giants of 20th-century American classical music.
James Ehnes, Andrew Armstrong - Ludwig van Beethoven: Violin Sonatas Nos. 6 & 9 'Kreutzer' (2017)

Ludwig van Beethoven: Violin Sonatas Nos. 6 & 9 'Kreutzer' (2017)
James Ehnes (violin), Andrew Armstrong (piano)

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 244 Mb | Artwork included
Classical | Label: Onyx | # ONYX4170 | 01:01:55

The duo of old friends James Ehnes and Andrew Armstrong has established itself as one of the most exciting of our times. Their albums of violin sonatas by Franck & Strauss, and Debussy, Elgar & Respighi have been praised by critics worldwide. For this new album they turn to Beethoven and two A major sonatas with very different moods. The 9th, ‘Kreutzer’ sonata, is a huge work, heroic and turbulent in character – a kind of concerto for violin and piano. It is middle period Beethoven at its most dramatic. By contrast, the 6th sonata is a serene, introspective work of great beauty which has tended to be overlooked by its more outward-looking siblings. The intimacy of this sonata – especially the slow movement - is all the more surprising as the original finale was removed by the composer, to become the finale of the ‘Kreutzer’. Beethoven wrote the gentle variations to conclude the 6th sonata.
James Ehnes, Wendy Chen - Prokofiev: The two Violin Sonatas and Five Melodies (2000)

James Ehnes, Wendy Chen - Prokofiev: The two Violin Sonatas and Five Melodies (2000)
EAC | FLAC (image+.cue, log) | Covers Included | 01:06:18 | 303 MB
Genre: Classical | Label: Analekta | Catalog: FL 2-3145

The lyrical element is the essence of Prokofiev's nature, whether it be that of the man or of his music and it is deliberately that he chooses to turn it to derision, to make it grotesque, to disfigure it. Through all the distortions, dilations, sudden stops and about-faces that the composer subjects them to, his themes and harmonies remain essentially lyrical.
James Ehnes - J.S.Bach: The Six Sonatas & Partitas for Solo Violin (2016) [Official Digital Download]

James Ehnes - J.S.Bach: The Six Sonatas & Partitas for Solo Violin (2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/44.1kHz | Time - 150:02 minutes | 1.47 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Digital Booklet

Johann Sebastian Bach's Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin, cousins to the Six Cello Suites written around the same period, are certainly to be placed at the pinnacle of the entire violin repertoire; however, they were not meant to be insurmountable. Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), ever the keen pedagogue, always composed music that was intended to be played as well as contemplated. His sons, and generations of budding musicians ever since, learned this the hard way, only to be later gratified in abundance. They all have crossed swords with the Orgelbüchlein, the Clavierbüchlein, the Well-Tempered Clavier or the aforementioned collections for solo stringed instrument, and they were bettered by them. It has been suggested these sonatas, partitas and suites must have been unplayable in the age of their composition.
James Ehnes - Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto, Octet (2010) (Repost)

James Ehnes - Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto, Octet (2010)
EAC | APE (image+.cue, log) | Covers Included | 57:31 | 278 MB
Genre: Classical | Label: ONYX | Catalog: LC 19017

The last of his orchestral compositions and one of his most enduringly popular pieces, Mendelssohn's violin concerto is as much a crowd-pleaser now as it was when premiered by Ferdinand David and the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra in 1845. Its unassuming focus on melody and dynamic interaction between soloist and orchestra – rather than merely on technical feats and virtuosic showmanship – ensures its place at the heart of the violin concerto repertoire.
James Ehnes, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra - Beethoven: Violin Concerto, Romance - Schubert: Romance (2017) [24/96]

James Ehnes, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra - Beethoven: Violin Concerto, Romance - Schubert: Romance (2017)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time - 71:17 minutes | 1.18 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Digital booklet

Beethoven’s Violin Concerto represents the supreme challenge for violinists. Far from being a virtuoso display piece, this is chamber music on a large scale, the last and greatest ‘classical’ violin concerto, giving the soloist no place to hide with a solo part that is often very exposed against sparse orchestral accompaniment. A lukewarm reception at the concerto’s premiere in 1806 led to it being forgotten until Joseph Joachim resurrected it in the 1850s and restored to its rightful position as one of the greatest and most popular concertos for the instrument. This is James Ehnes’ first recording of this concerto, and he is supported sensitively by the award winning RLPO and fellow violinist-turned-conductor, Andrew Manze. The combination of soloist, orchestra and conductor on this recording is a dream team. …
James Ehnes, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra - Beethoven: Violin Concerto, Romance - Schubert: Romance (2017)

James Ehnes, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra - Beethoven: Violin Concerto, Romance - Schubert: Romance
Classical | WEB FLAC (tracks) & d. booklet | 71:17 min | 320 MB
Label: PM Classics / Onyx | Tracks: 06 | Rls.date: 2017

Beethoven’s Violin Concerto represents the supreme challenge for violinists. Far from being a virtuoso display piece, this is chamber music on a large scale, the last and greatest ‘classical’ violin concerto, giving the soloist no place to hide with a solo part that is often very exposed against sparse orchestral accompaniment. A lukewarm reception at the concerto’s premiere in 1806 led to it being forgotten until Joseph Joachim resurrected it in the 1850s and restored to its rightful position as one of the greatest and most popular concertos for the instrument.
Rustem Hayroudinoff, James Ehnes - Antonín Dvořák: Piano Concerto, Violin Concerto (2005)

Rustem Hayroudinoff, James Ehnes - Antonín Dvořák: Piano Concerto, Violin Concerto (2005)
EAC | FLAC (image+.cue, log) | Covers + Digital Booklet | 70:29 | 302 MB
Genre: Classical | Label: Chandos Records | Catalog: CHAN 10309

It says much for the Russian pianist Rustem Hayroudinoff that he gives such a command- ing performance of the Dvorák Piano Concerto, always a tricky work to play thanks to unpianistic piano writing. Sviatoslav Richter, after making his classic recording with Carlos Kleiber, pronounced that it was the most difficult concerto he had ever tackled but somehow he made the original, unrevised piano-writing – which he insisted on using – sound totally convincing.