Duke Ellington Count Basie First Time

Duke Ellington & Count Basie - First Time (1961) 24-Bit/96-kHz Vinyl Rip

Duke Ellington & Count Basie - First Time
Vinyl Rip in 24-Bit/96-kHz | FLAC tracks | no cue | no log | Covers | FS, MU | 840 MB 3% rec
1961 | Genre: Jazz | Label: CBS/Sony | 20AP-1471 | Japanese pressing
Rated 4.5 out of 5 star by AllMusic Guide

At first glance this collaboration should not have worked. The Duke Ellington and Count Basie Orchestras had already been competitors for 25 years but the leaders' mutual admiration (Ellington was one of Basie's main idols) and some brilliant planning made this a very successful and surprisingly uncrowded encounter. On most selections Ellington and Basie both play piano (their interaction with each other is wonderful) and the arrangements allowed the stars from both bands to take turns soloing. "Segue in C" is the highpoint but versions of "Until I Met You," "Battle Royal" and "Jumpin' at the Woodside" are not far behind.
( Scott Yanow - AllMusic Guide )
Duke Ellington & Count Basie – First Time! The Count Meets The Duke (1961)(CBS)

Duke Ellington & Count Basie – First Time! The Count Meets The Duke (1961)(CBS)
1961 | Genre: Jazz | EAC RIP | FLAC+CUE+LOG+HQ-Covers(400Dpi) | 243Mb+17Mb

The two greatest big bands in jazz history side by side on your headphones: What can be more glorious? If, as Billy Strayhorn said, Duke Ellington's band was his instrument, then this 1961 session finds Ellington and Count Basie "trading fours" as it were. The composer credits and solo space are divided democratically, four songs from Duke's camp, four from Basie's. The sparring between soloists of both bands is a pure delight, especially the gentle conversations between the two leaders-pianists, who finish each other's thoughts as if all four hands were attached to one unified torso. Highlights include two engaging new Duke compositions, the blistering opener "Battle Royal" and the impulsive "Wild Man" and the closing Basie chestnut "Jumpin' at the Woodside," on which the lead tenors Frank Foster and Paul Gonsalves engage in ferocious dueling. Amazingly, there is no toe-stepping amid the rousing interplay.
Duke Ellington and Count Basie - First Time! The Count Meets the Duke (1961) [Reissue 2002] PS3 ISO + Hi-Res FLAC

Duke Ellington & Count Basie - First Time! The Count Meets the Duke (1961) [Reissue 2002]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 73:23 minutes | Scans included | 2,35 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Full Scans included | 1,53 GB
Duke Ellington - Duke Ellington Meets Count Basie (1962) {1999 Columbia Remaster}

Duke Ellington - Duke Ellington Meets Count Basie (1962) {1999 Columbia Remaster}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 489 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 176 Mb
Full Artwork @ 600 dpi (jpg) -> 220 Mb | 5% repair rar
© 1999 Columbia / Legacy / Sony Music | CK 65571
Jazz / Big Band / Swing

At first glance this collaboration should not have worked. The Duke Ellington and Count Basie Orchestras had already been competitors for 25 years but the leaders' mutual admiration (Ellington was one of Basie's main idols) and some brilliant planning made this a very successful and surprisingly uncrowded encounter. On most selections Ellington and Basie both play piano (their interaction with each other is wonderful) and the arrangements allowed the stars from both bands to take turns soloing. "Segue in C" is the highpoint but versions of "Until I Met You," "Battle Royal" and "Jumpin' at the Woodside" are not far behind.
Slavic Soul Party - Plays Duke Ellington's Far East Suite (2016)

Slavic Soul Party - Plays Duke Ellington's Far East Suite (2016)
Jazz, Funk, World | MP3 CBR 320 kbps | Artworks | 00:52:14 | 122 MB
Label: Ropeadope | Release Year: 2016

A creative re-imagination of a classic recording, capturing the essence of the Ellington Orchestra’s timeless sound while offering new arrangements and a refreshing liveliness.
Louis Armstrong & Duke Ellington - Recording Together For The First Time / The Great Reunion ... (1988) [MFSL, UDCD 514]

Louis Armstrong & Duke Ellington - Recording Together For The First Time / The Great Reunion … (1988)
EAC | Flac(Image) + Cue + Log & MP3 CBR 320Kbps
Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab, UDCD 514 | ~ 367 or 176 Mb | Scans Included
Jazz, Big Band

Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington were (and are) two of the main stems of jazz. Any way you look at it, just about everything that's ever happened in this music leads directly – or indirectly – back to them. Both men were born on the cusp of the 19th and 20th centuries, and each became established as a leader during the middle '20s. …
Count Basie & Joe Williams - Count Basie Swings, Joe Williams Sings (1955) Reissue 1993

Count Basie & Joe Williams - Count Basie Swings, Joe Williams Sings (1955)
EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 135 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 103 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans ~ 62 Mb
Vocal Jazz, Swing, Big Band, Standarts | Label: Verve | # 519 852-2 | Time: 00:42:56

Joe Williams' debut as the featured vocalist in Count Basie's band was one of those landmark moments that even savvy observers don't fully appreciate when it occurs, then realize years later how momentous an event they witnessed. Williams brought a different presence to the great Basie orchestra than the one Jimmy Rushing provided; he couldn't shout like Rushing, but he was more effective on romantic and sentimental material, while he was almost as spectacular on surging blues, up-tempo wailers, and stomping standards. Basie's band maintained an incredible groove behind Williams, who moved from authoritative statements on "Every Day I Have the Blues" and "Please Send Me Someone to Love" to brisk workouts on "Roll 'Em Pete" and his definitive hit, "All Right, OK, You Win".
Duke Ellington And His Orchestra - Duke Ellington and His Orchestra Live in Cologne 1969 (2016)

Duke Ellington And His Orchestra - Duke Ellington and His Orchestra Live in Cologne 1969 (2016)
MP3 320 kbps CBR | 01:08:58 | 160 MB
Genre: Jazz | Label: Jazzline

Duke Ellington and his Orchestra in Cologne. For the first time released featuring the soloists Cat Anderson, Cootie Williams, Lawrence Brown, Johnny Hodges and Paul Gonsalves to name a few. Including the Ellington Hits Take The A-Train, Caravan, Mood Indigo, Sophisticated Lady and many more.

Duke Ellington - Reminiscing In Tempo (1991)  Music

Posted by Designol at Nov. 4, 2016
Duke Ellington - Reminiscing In Tempo (1991)

Duke Ellington - Reminiscing In Tempo (1991)
EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 241 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 190 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans included
Genre: Jazz, Big Band, Swing | Label: Columbia/Legacy | # CK 48654 | Time: 01:16:41

Just the fact that Ellington's extended masterpiece "Reminiscing in Tempo" is included here in its original and continuous form is reason enough to pick up this compilation. Initially recorded in 1935, "Reminiscing" was the first thoroughly composed jazz piece and one that not only demonstrated Ellington's knack for longer forms, but also featured practically all of his singular soloists. Upon its first release, the 13-minute piece was broken up over a few 78s, later making its way into EP form. Currently, the Classics label includes it on one of its Chronological discs, but spread over four distinct tracks. So, this 1991 Columbia release might be the only way to get this great work in its seamless form as it was originally recorded. Collector's concerns aside, this CD was the audio companion to an Ellington documentary aired on PBS. Predictably, it provides something of an overview of Ellington's career, beginning with a recording of "The Mooche" from his Cotton Club days in the late '20s up through a version of "Black Beauty" from 1960.
Louis Armstrong & Duke Ellington - The Complete Louis Armstrong & Duke Ellington Sessions, 1961 (1990)

Louis Armstrong & Duke Ellington - The Complete Sessions, 1961 (1990)
EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 333 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 171 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans included
Swing, Vocal Jazz, Mainstream Jazz | Roulette Jazz/Capitol | # CDP 593844 | 01:08:27

Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington were (and are) two of the main stems of jazz. Any way you look at it, just about everything that's ever happened in this music leads directly – or indirectly – back to them. Both men were born on the cusp of the 19th and 20th centuries, and each became established as a leader during the middle '20s. Although their paths had crossed from time to time over the years, nobody in the entertainment industry had ever managed to get Armstrong and Ellington into a recording studio to make an album together. On April 3, 1961, producer Bob Thiele achieved what should be regarded as one of his greatest accomplishments; he organized and supervised a seven-and-a-half-hour session at RCA Victor's Studio One on East 24th Street in Manhattan, using a sextet combining Duke Ellington with Louis Armstrong & His All-Stars. This group included ex-Ellington clarinetist Barney Bigard, ex-Jimmie Lunceford swing-to-bop trombonist Trummy Young, bassist Mort Herbert, and drummer Danny Barcelona. A second session took place during the afternoon of the following day.