People Development

Promoting Sustainable Local and Community Economic Development (ASPA Series in Public Administration and Public Policy)(Repost)

Promoting Sustainable Local and Community Economic Development (ASPA Series in Public Administration and Public Policy) by Roland V. Anglin
English | 2010 | ISBN: 1420088106 | 301 Pages | PDF | 2.40 MB

Promoting Sustainable Local and Community Economic Development (repost)  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by interes at June 22, 2015
Promoting Sustainable Local and Community Economic Development (repost)

Promoting Sustainable Local and Community Economic Development by Roland V. Anglin
English | 2010 | ISBN: 1420088106 | 301 pages | PDF | 2,4 MB

Promoting Sustainable Local and Community Economic Development  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by interes at Aug. 16, 2014
Promoting Sustainable Local and Community Economic Development

Promoting Sustainable Local and Community Economic Development by Roland V. Anglin
English | 2010 | ISBN: 1420088106 | 301 pages | PDF | 2,4 MB

Growing local economies, empowering communities, revitalizing downtowns, developing entrepreneurship, building leadership, and enhancing nonprofits — you can achieve all these benefits and more with a comprehensive and strategic revitalization plan.
Unbreakable: Building the Resilience of the Poor in the Face of Natural Disasters (Climate Change and Development)

Unbreakable: Building the Resilience of the Poor in the Face of Natural Disasters (Climate Change and Development) by Stephane Hallegatte
English | Dec. 6, 2016 | ISBN: 1464810036 | 201 Pages | PDF | 37 MB

'Economic losses from natural disasters totaled $92 billion in 2015.' Such statements, all too commonplace, assess the severity of disasters by no other measure than the damage inflicted on buildings, infrastructure, and agricultural production. But $1 in losses does not mean the same thing to a rich person that it does to a poor person; the gravity of a $92 billion loss depends on who experiences it.
Central America Urbanization Review: Making Cities Work for Central America (Directions in Development)

Central America Urbanization Review: Making Cities Work for Central America (Directions in Development) by Augustin Maria
English | Mar. 22, 2017 | ISBN: 1464809852 | 203 Pages | PDF | 7 MB

Central America is undergoing an important transition. Urban populations are increasing at accelerated speeds, bringing pressing challenges for development, as well as opportunities to boost sustained, inclusive and resilient growth. Today, 59 percent of the region’s population lives in urban areas, but it is expected that 7 out of 10 people will live in cities within the next generation.
Leveraging the Potential of Argentine Cities: A Framework for Policy Action (Directions in Development)

Leveraging the Potential of Argentine Cities: A Framework for Policy Action (Directions in Development) by Elisa Muzzini
English | Dec. 16, 2016 | ISBN: 1464808406 | 457 Pages | PDF | 15 MB

Argentina’s path to economic prosperity is through efficient, sustainable and economically thriving cities. Not only are cities a spatial concentration of people, but also they generate agglomeration economies by concentrating ideas, talent, and knowledge. Argentina is one of the most urbanized countries in Latin America, with 90 percent of Argentine people currently living in cities. Argentina’s cities are geographically and economically diverse, and its largest urban area – Metropolitan Buenos Aires – is one of Latin America’s urban giants.

Mining in Africa: Are Local Communities Better Off? (Africa Development Forum)  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by lengen at Feb. 21, 2018
Mining in Africa: Are Local Communities Better Off? (Africa Development Forum)

Mining in Africa: Are Local Communities Better Off? (Africa Development Forum) by Punam Chuhan-Pole
English | Feb. 16, 2017 | ISBN: 1464808198 | 215 Pages | PDF | 7 MB

Africa s resource boom has lifted growth throughout the region, but it has been less successful in improving citizen s well-being and livelihoods. People living in Africa s resource-rich countries are 3 percent less literate, have shorter life expectancy by 4.5 years, and have higher rates of malnutrition among women and children. This slow pace of poverty reduction is frequently attributed to economic growth that is led by natural resources the so-called natural resource curse. Going beyond the aggregate impact, do communities living close to mining centers suffer from a resource curse as well?

From Oil to Cities: Nigeria's Next Transformation (Directions in Development)  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by lengen at Feb. 21, 2018
From Oil to Cities: Nigeria's Next Transformation (Directions in Development)

From Oil to Cities: Nigeria's Next Transformation (Directions in Development) by The World Bank
English | July 15, 2016 | ISBN: 1464807922 | 229 Pages | PDF | 7 MB

Nigeria s cities already home to 85 million people are expected to double that number in 30 years. Even in the best of times, this rate of growth would challenge the provision of sufficient land, finance, infrastructure, and other services. Yet the country is also grappling with the dramatic plunge in world oil prices. Bustling urban centers, when well served, can boost economic growth and slash poverty. To seize that opportunity, Nigeria needs to implement significant and urgent reforms.

World Development Report 2016: Digital Dividends  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by lengen at Feb. 21, 2018
World Development Report 2016: Digital Dividends

World Development Report 2016: Digital Dividends by World Bank Group
English | Jan. 14, 2016 | ISBN: 1464806713 | 359 Pages | PDF | 10 MB

Digital technologies are spreading rapidly, but digital dividends–the broader benefits of faster growth, more jobs, and better services–are not. If more than 40 percent of adults in East Africa pay their utility bills using a mobile phone, why can’t others around the world do the same? If 8 million entrepreneurs in China–one third of them women–can use an e-commerce platform to export goods to 120 countries, why can’t entrepreneurs elsewhere achieve the same global reach?
Stop the Violence in Latin America: A Look at Prevention from Cradle to Adulthood (Latin American Development Forum)

Stop the Violence in Latin America: A Look at Prevention from Cradle to Adulthood (Latin American Development Forum) by Laura Chioda
English | June 19, 2017 | ISBN: 1464806640 | 425 Pages | PDF | 13 MB

The Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region has the undesirable distinction of being the world's most violent region, with 24.7 homicides per 100,000 inhabitants. The magnitude of the problem is staggering and persistent. Of the top 50 most violent cities in the world, 42 are in LAC. In 2010 alone, 142,302 people in LAC fell victim to homicide, representing 390 homicides per day and 4.06 homicides every 15 minutes. Crime disproportionately affects young men aged 20 to 24, whose homicide rate of 92 per 100,000 nearly quadruples that of the region.