Martha Argerich Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto

Martha Argerich - Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1, The Nutcracker Suite (1995)

Martha Argerich - Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1, The Nutcracker Suite (1995)
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, cond. Claudio Abbado, Nicolas Economou (piano)
MP3 CBR 320kbps | 122 MB
Classical/Piano/Orchestra | Deutsche Grammophon | 53:04

Some artists grow into a sort of proprietary relationship with certain pieces of music. If anyone today owns this concerto, it's Martha Argerich. She's recorded it three times, and this latest version seems to sum up an entire lifetime of living with and loving the music. Not only does Argerich simply find more in the notes than almost anyone else, she also does it with a sense of complete spontaneity and naturalness. She's also the most exciting pianist alive, which certainly doesn't hurt in such dazzling music. Claudio Abbado is one of her regular concerto accompanists, and he knows better than to try to take over an Argerich performance. This is her show, and he gives her the kind of support she needs to feel free to work her interpretive magic. – David Hurwitz
Tchaikovsky · Piano Concerto No. 1 · Martha Algerich - Claudio Abbado

Tchaikovsky · Piano Concerto No. 1 · Martha Algerich - Claudio Abbado
EAC Rip | Individual FLAC, M3U+CUE+LOG, Booklet | 194 MB | RAR 3% Recovery | RS
Label: DG | Cat no.: 449 816-2 | 1995
Martha Argerich, Berliner Philharmoniker, Claudio Abbado - Prokofiev & Ravel: Piano Concertos (1995/2015) [24/96]

Martha Argerich, Berliner Philharmoniker, Claudio Abbado - Prokofiev & Ravel: Piano Concertos (1995/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time - 70:45 minutes | 1.27 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Digital Booklet

This is the original Prokofiev/Ravel concerto coupling as it appeared on LP; the Prokofiev has also been coupled with the Tchaikovsky First Concerto. I prefer this edition since superb performances of the Ravel are less common. The young (1967) Martha Argerich plays the Prokofiev for maximum brilliance but leavens the Ravel with the composer's ironic lyricism. It's very effective. The bonus is one of the greatest performances of the Ravel piano suite ever recorded, but it leaves me wondering what will happen to the remainder of the original LP. All those solo Ravel pieces should be in the catalog; as Argerich plays them, they offer a primer on what keyboard color is all about.
Various Artists - 50 Piano Masterworks (2017) {3CD Set Deutsche Grammophon 0289 482 8045 2}

Various Artists - 50 Piano Masterworks (2017) {3CD Set Deutsche Grammophon 0289 482 8045 2}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 793 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 523 Mb
Artwork @ 300 dpi (png) -> 11 Mb | 5% repair rar
© 2017 Deutsche Grammophon | 0289 482 8045 2
Classical / Piano

Deutsche Grammophon, home to the greatest pianists, presents a collection of the most essential piano masterworks – a collection of the most beautiful, exciting and moving pieces for piano; presenting the world’s best composers, popular works, and outstanding performances from Deutsche Grammophon’s unrivalled roster of pianists: from the greats – Horowitz, Gilels, Richter, Argerich – to the younger generation: Seong-Jin Cho, Alice Sara Ott, Vikingur Ólafsson, Hélène Grimaud, Yuja Wang. Also represented are the new faces of composition – Max Richter and Ludovico Einaudi.
Geoffrey Tozer, LPO, Neeme Jarvi - Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.3; Symphony No.7 (1993)

Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.3; Symphony No.7 (1993)
Geoffrey Tozer, piano; The London Philharmonic; Neeme Järvi, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 255 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 137 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Chandos | # CHAN 9130 | Time: 00:57:22

The Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 3 is rarely heard, though it is a finely crafted work worth greater attention. It has suffered alongside the magnificent and superior Second and the ever-popular First. Moreover, it is not a bona fide concerto at all, the composer having completed only the first movement before his sudden death in 1893. Contrary to the suggestion of a few, it is highly unlikely he intended to produce a one-movement concerto. Tchaikovsky wrote two other piano pieces the same year bearing the titles "Andante" and "Finale," respectively. Following his death, Taneyev orchestrated these and attached them to the Concerto, though Tchaikovsky had left no indication they were to be a part of it. But the pair did share something in common with the completed first movement: a theme source – the incomplete Symphony No. 7. In any event, the opening movement of this Concerto is the most compelling, featuring an exuberant main theme whose first two notes are the central melodic element. An attractive slow melody is soon presented, followed by a theme of great vivacity and rhythmic drive.
Van Cliburn - Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1; Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 3; Kabalevsky: Rondo (2008)

Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1; Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 3; Kabalevsky: Rondo (2008)
Final of the 1958 Tchaikovsky Competition (Previously unpublished)
Van Cliburn, piano; Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra; Kyrill Kondrashin, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 341 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 202 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Testament | # SBT1440 | Time: 01:19:54

Deep in the heart of the Cold War, there was once a miracle in Moscow – Texas-based classical pianist Van Cliburn, of whom no one had heard, conquered at the First Tchaikovsky Competition, an event set aside to showcase Soviet talent. Cliburn was warned by his own government not to go, given the tense political relationship between the United States and Soviet Union at the time, and once he arrived he was greeted as a party crasher, subject to hostile stares and animosity of the kind he had never dreamed of back in Texas. And it was Cliburn, at the end, which brought down the house, and held the award. Back in America, he was greeted with a ticker tape parade and was the subject of a best-selling biography by Abram Chasins, The Van Cliburn Story, copies of which continue to clog the shelves of American thrift stores five decades hence. Ultimately, though, Cliburn's celebrity lost its luster. Nerves, ultra-picky perfectionism, and mishandling by management led to his early retirement from the concert scene; his greatest latter-day achievement being the force behind the Van Cliburn Piano Competition, America's most prestigious such event.
Tatiana Nikolayeva - P.I. Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.2, Op.44; Concert Fantasy, Op.56 (2008) [The Russian Piano Tradition]

Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.2, Op.44; Concert Fantasy, Op.56 (2008)
Tatiana Nikolayeva, piano; USSR State Symphony Orchestra
conducted by Nikolai Anosov & Kyrill Kondrashin

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 203 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 201 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Appian | # APR5666 | Time: 01:16:08

These three titles inaugurate the Goldenweiser School, the last of the three great teaching traditions to be covered in this comprehensive survey of the many great pianists who worked in Russia in the Soviet era. Along with Goldenweiser himself we start with Nikolayeva and Ginzburg. The bulk of the issues in THE RUSSIAN PIANO TRADITION will be divided into 'schools' which represent the three main teachers of this period - Neuhaus, Goldenweiser and Igumnov, - and their pupils. Today Nikolayeva (1924-1993) is remembered mainly as a Bach player and also as the definitive performer of Shostakovich's 24 Preludes & Fugues, which were inspired by, and written for, her after the composer heard her play Bach in the 1950 Leipzig Bach competition (which she won). However, to limit Nikolayeva's reputation to these two composers would be doing her a great disservice. She had a vast repertoire and her recordings include concertos by Bartok, Medtner, Prokofiev Stravinsky and several Soviet composers - including her own concerto, as she was also a composer! Further, she recorded the complete Beethoven sonatas and much other standard repertoire from the 19th century. This CD presents two recording premieres - the first ever recording of the Tchaikovsky Concert Fantasy Op56 and the first recording of the original version of Tchaikovsky's 2nd Piano Concerto.
Arcadi Volodos - Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.1, Rachmaninoff: Solo Piano Works (2003)

Arcadi Volodos - Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.1, Rachmaninoff: Solo Piano Works (2003)
MP3 (CBR 320 kbps) | 54:27 | 136 MB
Genre: Classical | Label: Sony Classical

Russian pianist Arcadi Volodos has been known for high-powered Liszt performances and for gee-whiz transcriptions of works like Mozart's Rondo alla turca that seem to add an impossible collection of polyphonic lines to the music. All that could have been expected from this 2003 recording of Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1 in B flat minor, Op. 23, was another big, powerful interpretation to join the others already out there.
John Browning - Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1 in B-Flat Minor, Op. 23 (1969/2017) [Official Digital Download 24/96]

John Browning - Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1 in B-Flat Minor, Op. 23 (1969/2017)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time - 30:57 minutes | 633 MB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front Cover

The American pianist, John Browning was born to musical parents. Having studied piano from age 5, he appeared as a soloist with the Denver Symphony at 10. In 1945 his family moved to Los Angeles. He spent two years at Occidental College there. He began his studies at Juilliard in 1950. He won the Leventritt Competition in New York City in 1955, and made his professional orchestral debut with the New York Philharmonic Orchestra in 1956.
Emil Gilels, CSO, Fritz Reiner - Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.1 & 1812 Overture (1955-1958/2014) [24/192]

Emil Gilels, CSO, Fritz Reiner - Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.1 & 1812 Overture (1955-1958/2014)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/192 kHz | Time - 46:32 minutes | 1.83 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Digital booklet

Gilels recorded this work several times, and the dierence to the other stereo recording in print is evident instantly. Just play the rst 10 seconds from the Gilels/Maazel recording and then this one: RCA in 1955 captured a cleaner, better, richer sound than EMI engineers 20 years later. So you are instantly captivated by the sound alone; and then follows a performance with tremendous sweep and boldness. Reiner is denitely instrumental in helping this along: he was a far better conductor than Maazel could ever aspire to. In a word: don't worry too much about niggling imperfections.