Lightnin' Hopkins Goin' Away

Lightnin' Hopkins - Goin' Away (1963) Remastered 1990  Music

Posted by Designol at Oct. 31, 2016
Lightnin' Hopkins - Goin' Away (1963) Remastered 1990

Lightnin' Hopkins - Goin' Away (1963) Remastered 1990
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 209 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 107 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans included
Genre: Acoustic Texas Blues | Label: Prestige Bluesville | # 00025218052221 | Time: 00:35:10

For the 1963 album Goin' Away, Lightnin' Hopkins was backed by a spare rhythm section – bassist Leonard Gaskin and drummer Herb Lovelle – who managed to follow his ramshackle, instinctual sense of rhythm quite dexterously, giving Hopkins' skeletal guitar playing some muscle. Still, the spotlight remains Hopkins, who is in fine form here. There are no real classics here, but everything is solid, particularly "Stranger Here" and "You Better Stop Her," making it worth investigation by serious fans of Hopkins' classic material.
Lightnin' Hopkins - Thinkin' And Worryin': The Aladdin Singles 1947-1952 (2016)


Acoustic Blues, RnB | MP3 CBR 320 kbps | 01:08:49 | 163 MB
Label: Jasmine Records | Release Year: 2016

Lightnin' Hopkins was one of the greatest and most popular authentic blues artists. These 26 titles comprise the first 13 singles released by Lightnin' Hopkins between 1947 and 1952. They weren't his first recordings but they were the first released under his own name. Although he did record with other musicians and even with full bands it's these acoustic classics that best illustrate his art and they are some of the most endearing blues tracks ever recorded. Includes the popular songs "Katie Mae Blues", "Big Mama Jump" and his biggest chart hit "Shotgun Blues". A true genius of the genre this Lightnin' Hopkins release by Jasmine is a must have for blues and R&B fans.

Lightnin' Hopkins - The Tradition Masters (2002)  Music

Posted by TmanHome at July 26, 2016
Lightnin' Hopkins - The Tradition Masters (2002)

Lightnin' Hopkins - The Tradition Masters (2002)
Blues | MP3 320 kbps CBR | 85 min | 199 MB
Label: Tradition | Rel: 2002

Lightnin' Hopkins' career, recording history, and music remain fascinating. Like John Lee Hooker, he served as a bridge between older country blues and the newer electric variety; like Hooker, he played in both styles while never losing the idiosyncratic nature of the earlier method (his electric music sounds like country blues on an electric guitar). Hopkins' long career also produced a terribly confusing discography, making the task of choosing a particular introductory disc a daunting one. The Tradition Masters, a two-disc set recorded by folklorist Mack McCormick around 1959-1960, is a good place to start for a couple of reasons. First, Hopkins is in his element here, relaxed and comfortable with the material. McCormick's desire to record him "pure and unplugged" also adds to the intensity of these sets, keeping the music focused and intimate. There are fun pieces like "Mama and Papa Hopkins" and "Get Off My Toe," and more familiar ones like "Trouble in Mind" and "See See Rider."
Lightnin' Hopkins - Lightnin' Hopkins Golden Tracks (Remastered) (2016)

Lightnin' Hopkins - Lightnin' Hopkins Golden Tracks (Remastered) (2016)
Blues | MP3 CBR 320 kbps | 01:29:42 | 206 MB
Label: J. Joes J. Edizioni Musicali | Release Year: 2016

Sam Hopkins was a Texas country bluesman of the highest caliber whose career began in the 1920s and stretched all the way into the 1980s. Along the way, Hopkins watched the genre change remarkably, but he never appreciably altered his mournful Lone Star sound, which translated onto both acoustic and electric guitar. Hopkins' nimble dexterity made intricate boogie riffs seem easy, and his fascinating penchant for improvising lyrics to fit whatever situation might arise made him a beloved blues troubadour. Hopkins' brothers John Henry and Joel were also talented bluesmen, but it was Sam who became a star. In 1920, he met the legendary Blind Lemon Jefferson at a social function, and even got a chance to play with him. Later, Hopkins served as Jefferson's guide. In his teens, Hopkins began working with another pre-war great, singer Texas Alexander, who was his cousin.

Lightnin' Hopkins - Double Blues (1989) [Repost, New Rip]  

Posted by Designol at Jan. 17, 2016
Lightnin' Hopkins - Double Blues (1989) [Repost, New Rip]

Lightnin' Hopkins - Double Blues (1989)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 350 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 182 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans ~ 99 Mb
Genre: Texas Blues | Label: Fantasy Records | # FCD-24702-2 | Time: 01:15:59 | Recorded in 1964

Lightnin' Hopkins' plaintive, soft-rolling blues style is exemplified on "Let's Go Sit on the Lawn," "Just a Wristwatch on My Arm," "I'm a Crawling Black Snake," Willie Dixon's "My Babe," and others. Accompanied only by himself on guitar (and oh what a guitar he plays), Leonard Gaskin (bass), and Herb Lovelle (drums), Hopkins' seductive, intricate guitar picks and strums will dance around in your head long after this CD has played. His voice, which sounds like it's aged in Camels and Jim Beam, conveys his heartfelt sagas to the fullest. A prolific songwriter, Hopkins wrote every song except the Dixon tune.
Lightnin' Hopkins & Billy Bizor - Wake Up The Dead (2015)

Lightnin' Hopkins & Billy Bizor - Wake Up The Dead
Blues | MP3 CBR 320 kbps | 149:06 min | 371 MB + 5% Recovery
Label: Cicadelic Records | Tracks: 38 | Rls.date: 2015

(2-CD set) Lightnin' Hopkins woke up The Dead when he played San Francisco in the 1960's and his song 'Wake Up The Dead' is the centerpiece of this two and a half hour journey into the electrified world of Texas blues. Accompanying Lightnin' on this journey is his long time harmonica player, Billy Bizor. While Lightnin' had a prolific recording career, Bizor's stature is relatively obscure due to the lack of solo recordings he released during his lifetime. Fortunately, 'Wake Up The Dead' seeks to rectify that situation by including the complete June 17, 1968 session with Lightnin' and Bizor, plus all of Bizors' 1969 solo recordings.

Lightnin' Hopkins - Shootin' Fire (2015)  

Posted by Pisulik at Dec. 24, 2015
Lightnin' Hopkins - Shootin' Fire (2015)

Lightnin' Hopkins - Shootin' Fire (2015)
Blues | MP3 CBR 320 kbps | 01:16:44 | 203 MB
Label: Cicadelic Records | Release Year: 2015

Lightnin' Hopkins recorded over a dozen songs for the Clarity Music Company at the "ACA" Recording Studio in Houston in April of 1969. These songs ranged from new originals, such as "Born In The Bottom", "December 7, 1941", "A Rainy Day In Houston", and "Stinking Foot", to oldies such as "Feel Like Ballin' The Jack", "Shake That Thing" and "Shinin' Moon". Since the 1970's some of these songs have been released on haphazard compilations with the bass and drums mixed too high, the guitar leads mixed too low, and excessive "reverb" in an attempt to make Lightnin' sound more contemporary. Now for the first time ever the original four track masters have been re-mixed without any of the extraneous studio misjudgments that marred previous releases. As an added bonus, previously unreleased recordings such as "Movin On Out When The Saints March In", "Old House Torn Down", "Mistrust My Baby And She Mistrust Me", and "Baby Please Don't Do Me Wrong" are included on this compendium of Lightnin' Hopkins gems. A large selection of never before seen photos, contracts, and documents rounds out this collection of rarities. The net result is 77 minutes of Lightnin' Hopkins in his prime "shootin' fire".

Lightnin' Hopkins - The Mega Collection (2015)  

Posted by tomashass at Nov. 23, 2015
Lightnin' Hopkins - The Mega Collection (2015)

Lightnin' Hopkins - The Mega Collection (2015)
MP3 320 kbps CBR | 04:01:45 | 564 MB
Genre: Blues | Label: Collection Oldies

Lightnin' Hopkins went from gigging at back-alley gin joints to starring at collegiate coffeehouses, appearing on TV programs, and touring Europe to boot. His once-flagging recording career went right through the roof, with albums for World Pacific; Vee-Jay; Bluesville; Bobby Robinson's Fire label (where he cut his classic "Mojo Hand" in 1960); Candid; Arhoolie; Prestige; Verve; and, in 1965, the first of several LPs for Stan Lewis' Shreveport-based Jewel logo.

Lightnin' Hopkins - Lightnin' Hopkins (1996)  

Posted by v3122 at July 13, 2015
Lightnin' Hopkins - Lightnin' Hopkins (1996)

Lightnin' Hopkins - Lightnin' Hopkins (1996)
EAC | Flac(Image) + Cue + Log & MP3 CBR 320Kbps
United Audio Entertainment/TKO, UAE 30252 | ~ 270 or 151 Mb | Scans(png) -> 103 Mb
Texas Blues

Sam Hopkins was a Texas country bluesman of the highest caliber whose career began in the 1920s and stretched all the way into the 1980s. Along the way, Hopkins watched the genre change remarkably, but he never appreciably altered his mournful Lone Star sound, which translated onto both acoustic and electric guitar. Hopkins' nimble dexterity made intricate boogie riffs seem easy, and his fascinating penchant for improvising lyrics to fit whatever situation might arise made him a beloved blues troubadour…
Lightnin' Hopkins - Blues Masters: The Very Best of Lightnin' Hopkins (2000)

Lightnin' Hopkins - Blues Masters: The Very Best of Lightnin' Hopkins (2000)
EAC | WV | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 287 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 172 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans included
Genre: Texas Blues, Electric Blues, Folk-Blues, Country Blues | Label: Rhino | # 81227-9860-2 | Time: 00:53:45

Pruning 16 tracks from Hopkins' extensive catalog for a best-of meant that some hard choices had to be made. The ones Rhino came up with won't satisfy everyone, but the label did take the correct road by sticking exclusively to the earliest part of his career, 1947-61. Perhaps the decision will offend some fans who feel that his 1960s and '70s work should be represented, but two things should be acknowledged. First, Hopkins, as is the case with most artists, did his most interesting recordings in the earlier part of his career. Second, as is the case with many blues artists, he did not vary his approach substantially throughout the decades. So what you have is a good assortment of his first 15 years on disc, taken from about ten labels, including both originals and covers, and placing the singer/guitarist in various instrumental contexts: with a full electric band (Sonny Terry is on a couple of 1961 cuts), as a solo guitarist, or accompanied by nothing more than a bass or additional guitarist.