Elgar Cello Concerto Enigma Variations

Edward Elgar - Cello Concerto, 'Enigma' Variations, 'Pomp and Circumstance' (2012) [Mischa Maisky, Giuseppe Sinopoli]

Edward Elgar - Cello Concerto, 'Enigma' Variations, 'Pomp and Circumstance' (2012)
Mischa Maisky, cello; Philharmonia Orchestra, conducted by Giuseppe Sinopoli

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 344 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 196 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Deutsche Grammophon | # 478 3619 GB | Time: 01:14:33

Enigma Variations is the work that secured Elgars reputation as a composer of international significance. The 14 variations are all character portraits of friends, including his wife and the composer himself, the most famous being the ninth, the achingly nostalgic Nimrod. The Cello Concerto is Elgars last substantial work and has become not only one of his best loved, but also one of the most popular concertos ever written for the instrument.
Edward Elgar - Cello Concerto, Enigma Variations, Introduction and Allegro, Elegy (1991) [Repost, New Rip]

Edward Elgar - Cello Concerto, Enigma Variations, Introduction and Allegro, Elegy (1991)
Hallé Orchestra, conducted by Sir John Barbirolli; André Navarra, cello

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 365 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 183 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: EMI | # CDM 7639552 | Time: 01:13:08

Barbirolli made later recordings of all the works on this CD and these have become cornerstones of the catalogue. These are earlier recordings that he did with his own orchestra, the Halle, in the 1950s. To start with, the recording quality is pretty amazing. They were recorded on 35mm film tape rather than half inch recording tape by the Mercury team and have astonishing immediacy and amazingly lifelike. Barbirolli uses an organ in the finale of the Enigma Variations. The recording is a little bass heavy but this is a small caveat. For people who consider Barbirolli to be a bit indulgent as a conductor, these recordings may come as a surprise. The performances are very direct and nicely flowing. They therefore complement rather than compete with the later recordings. Of course, Barbirolli's later recording of the Cello Concerto with Jacqueline du Pre is a very famous and special rendition of the work. However, it is not without its detractors. Andre Navarra, by contrast, plays with golden tone. He plays gorgeously. Highly recommended.
Edward Elgar : Cello Concerto - Enigma Variations -Serenade - Mischa Maisky - Philharmonia Orchestra - Giuseppe Sinopoli

Edward Elgar : Cello Concerto op.85 - Enigma Variations op.35 - Serenade op.20
Mischa Maisky - Philharmonia Orchestra - Giuseppe Sinopoli

Unknown Rip | APE tracks (No Cue+No Log) | Complete Scans | 77 min. | 288 MB
19th Century Music | 20th Century Music | Orchestral Music | Deutsche Grammophon 445 511-2 | 1995

Edward Elgar (1857 – 1934) was an English composer, many of whose works have achieved enduring popularity. Among his best-known compositions are orchestral works including the Enigma Variations, the Pomp and Circumstance Marches, concertos for violin and cello, and two symphonies.

Elgar - Cello Concerto, Enigma Variations - Navarra, Barbirolli (1956)  Music

Posted by tropical_penguin at Nov. 7, 2009
Elgar - Cello Concerto, Enigma Variations - Navarra, Barbirolli (1956)

Elgar - Cello Concerto, Enigma Variations - Navarra, Barbirolli (1956)
EAC FLAC + CUE, Log, Scans | 332 MB
Classical | EMI, rec. 1956, rel. 1991 | RAR 1% Recovery | RS.com
André Navarra, cello | John Barbirolli, Hallé Orchestra

Jacqueline du Pre, Daniel Barenboim - Elgar: Cello Concerto, "Enigma" Variations (2004)

Jacqueline du Pre, Daniel Barenboim - Elgar: Cello Concerto, "Enigma" Variations (2004)
MP3 (CBR 320 kbps) | 01:12:58 | 175 MB
Genre: Classical | Label: Sony Classical

Why has one piece of music here, the Elgar Cello Concerto played by Jacqueline DuPre become so legendary? Of course it is the music itself. It has an overpowerful haunting deeply hypnotic feeling. Elgar wrote it after his recovery from a serious illness towards the end of the First War, and his thoughts were certainly on the suffering of life, and the inevitability of death. Du Pre brings to the piece not only her great mastery as cellist, but some deeper element of feeling. There is in the playing a sense of romantic abandoment of wild disturbance, and of intense and even ferious concentration.
William Boughton, ESO - Edward Elgar: Enigma Variations, Cockaigne and Froissart Overtures (1989)

Edward Elgar - Enigma Variations, Cockaigne and Froissart Overtures (1989)
English Symphony Orchestra, conducted by William Boughton

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 240 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 165 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Nimbus Records | # NI 5206 | Time: 01:00:26

There are basically two ways in which conductors may approach the Enigma Variations. Either they can take the music at its face value, treating the set of variations as a symphonically developed whole; or they can treat the work as a series of miniature character sketches of Elgar’s “friends pictured within”, highlighting the personalities of the miscellaneous collection of individuals involved. William Boughton in this reading opts for the second option, and the result bubbles with life.
Sir Georg Solti - Kodaly: The Peacock Variations; Blacher: Paganini Variations; Elgar: Enigma Variations (1997)

Zoltán Kodály - The Peacock Variations, Boris Blacher - Paganini Variations, Edward Elgar - Enigma Variations (1997)
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Sir Georg Solti

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 317 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 187 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: London/Decca | # 452 853-2 | Time: 01:07:41

Celebrating his half-century as a Decca artist, as well as his eighty-fifth birthday, Sir Georg Solti here offers a nicely autobiographical collection of three sets of variations: the Peacock Variations of Kodaly representing his Hungarian roots, the lively Paganini Variations of Blacher a recognition of his years as German citizen, and finally a tribute to his unique Britishness in Elgar's Enigma Variations. The disc is also a tribute to the Vienna Philharmonic and Solti's special relationship with that orchestra, with whom he recorded these live performances in the Musikverein last April. You have only to compare this warmly expressive, subtly nuanced, and deeply felt account of the Elgar with Solti's earlier Chicago version of 1974 to appreciate not only the quality of this great Viennese orchestra, but the way in which Solti has mellowed over the last two decades.
BBC Symphony Chorus & Orchestra, Sir Andrew Davis - Edward Elgar: The Dream of Gerontius; Sea Pictures (2014) 2 CDs

Edward Elgar - The Dream of Gerontius; Sea Pictures (2014) 2 CDs
Sarah Connolly, mezzo-soprano; Stuart Skelton, tenor; David Soar, bass
BBC Symphony Chorus & Orchestra, conducted by Sir Andrew Davis

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 522 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 312 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans included
Genre: Classical, Choral | Label: Chandos | # CHSA 5140(2) | Time: 02:04:44

Chandos Records is delighted to present this new recording of Elgar’s choral masterpiece The Dream of Gerontius and the enduringly popular song cycle Sea Pictures. The BBC Symphony Orchestra and Chorus are conducted by Sir Andrew Davis, a peerless Elgarian who this year was awarded the prestigious Elgar Society Medal in recognition of his outstanding contribution to the composer’s music. In Gerontius the soloists are Stuart Skelton, David Soar and Sarah Connolly, who also sings in Sea Pictures. This recording was made in the days leading up to their triumphant live performance of Gerontius in April of this year in which Skelton was praised as ‘the ideal tenor for the role of Gerontius’, Soar described as ‘an implacable, dark sounding Priest’ and Connolly, ‘a consummately polished Angel’ (The Guardian).
Edward Elgar - The Dream of Gerontius, Op. 38 (1999) 2 CDs [Sir John Barbirolli]

Edward Elgar - The Dream of Gerontius, Op. 38 (1999) 2 CDs
Hallé Orchestra & Choir; Sheffield Philharmonic Chorus; Ambrosian Singers; conducted by Sir John Barbirolli
Richard Lewis, tenor; Dame Janet Baker, mezzo-soprano; Kim Borg, bass

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 512 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 252 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans included
Genre: Classical, Choral, Oratorio | Label: EMI | # 7243 5 73579 2 0 | Time: 01:38:16

Perhaps part of what sets this recording apart from its competitors is Barbirolli's overall conception of the work: the liner notes point out that he always called the work Elgar's "*Dream,*" and not "Gerontius." This seemingly simple change results in a completely different outlook on the work. In emphasizing the dream-like quality of the work, Barbirolli is at once more daring and more orthodox than his competitors, allowing the quirkiness of Elgar's orchestration and choral writing to burst out time and time again, here cellos coming to the fore, there a clarinet emerging in sudden duet with one of the soloists. Barbirolli is doing nothing more than giving us what's on the page, but what a difference this makes!
Mstislav Rostropovitch, Seiji Ozawa - Dvořák: Cello Concerto, Tchaikovsky: Variations on a Rococo Theme (1987)

Mstislav Rostropovitch, Seiji Ozawa - Dvorak: Cello Concerto, Tchaikovsky: Variations on a Rococo Theme (1987)
EAC | FLAC (image+.cue, log) - 193 MB | MP3 (CBR 320 kbps) - 137 MB | Covers Included | 56:31
Genre: Classical | Label: Erato | Catalog: 45252

The late Mstislav Rostropovich and Seiji Ozawa deliver probably the greatest digital recording of the Dvorak concerto. For those familiar with the analog Karajan/Rostropovich recording, this digital recording finds the soloist creating a similar impression married with a more supportive Ozawa and the Boston Symphony. Karajan's creamy string sound and often overly-dramatic stylization is replaced here by Ozawa's stricter approach; his handling of the orchestra is masterful in this taught, precise reading. The legendary Boston Symphony responds resplendently and, although they may not highlight the rustic Czech idiom of this music, they certainly bring much charm, warmth, and expected musicality to the accompaniment. But enough about the orchestra - on to Rostropovich.