Christian Thinkers

Fifty Key Christian Thinkers [Repost]  

Posted by ChrisRedfield at Oct. 13, 2014
Fifty Key Christian Thinkers [Repost]

Peter McEnhill, G. M. Newlands - Fifty Key Christian Thinkers
Published: 2004-08-31 | ISBN: 0415170494, 0415170508 | PDF | 320 pages | 3 MB

Calvin (Outstanding Christian Thinkers)  

Posted by nebulae at March 5, 2014
Calvin (Outstanding Christian Thinkers)

T. H. L. Parker, "Calvin (Outstanding Christian Thinkers)"
English | ISBN: 082646369X, 0225665751 | 2003 | 178 pages | PDF | 9 MB

Fifty Key Christian Thinkers (repost)  

Posted by Veslefrikk at Oct. 2, 2013
Fifty Key Christian Thinkers (repost)

Fifty Key Christian Thinkers
Routledge | 2002 | ISBN: 0415170508, 0415170494 | 248 pages | PDF | 1,2 MB
Christian Encounters with Iran: Engaging Muslim Thinkers after the Revolution (repost)

Christian Encounters with Iran: Engaging Muslim Thinkers after the Revolution by Sasan Tavassoli
English | 2011-05-15 | ISBN: 1845117611 | PDF | 304 pages | 2 MB
Beyond Theodicy: Jewish and Christian Continental Thinkers Respond to the Holocaust

Sarah Katherine Pinnock - Beyond Theodicy: Jewish and Christian Continental Thinkers Respond to the Holocaust
Published: 2002-09-26 | ISBN: 0791455246, 0791455238 | PDF | 208 pages | 3 MB
Christian Encounters with Iran: Engaging Muslim Thinkers after the Revolution

Sasan Tavassoli - Christian Encounters with Iran: Engaging Muslim Thinkers after the Revolution
Published: 2011-05-15 | ISBN: 1845117611 | PDF | 304 pages | 3 MB
Norman L. Geisler, "Why I Am a Christian: Leading Thinkers Explain Why They Believe"(Repost)

Norman L. Geisler, "Why I Am a Christian: Leading Thinkers Explain Why They Believe"
ISBN: 080106712X | edition 2006 | PDF | 305 pages | 13 mb

Despite contributions from high-profile writers such as Ravi Zacharias, Josh McDowell and Peter Kreeft, this anthology adds nothing to the age-old genre of Christian apologetics. It opens with essays defending both truth and theism against postmodern atheists, and eventually moves to specifically Christian teachings: "Why I Believe the Bible Is the Word of God," "Why I Believe Jesus Is the Messiah and Son of God," and "Why I Have Chosen to Follow Christ." Some essays, such as J.P. Moreland's autobiographical discussion of his choice to follow Jesus, are stirring.

TTC VIDEO - History of Christian Theology (2011)  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by groovebeat at Dec. 31, 2011
TTC VIDEO - History of Christian Theology (2011)

TTC VIDEO - History of Christian Theology (2011)
DVD-Rip | AVI | XviD MPEG4 @ 1 Mbit/s | 640x480 | MP3 Stereo @ 128 Kbit/s 48 KHz | 18 Hours | 6.82 GB
Genre: History, Christian Theology | Label: The Great Courses | Language: English

Some 2,000 years ago, a man walked the earth who had a greater impact than any other person in history. Lowly born, he rose to prominence as he spread his vision of the redemption of the world. He attracted the attention of faithful disciples and suspicious local authorities. Eventually, he was tried, convicted, and executed. Today, his story is known the world over. And yet, more than two millennia later, great thinkers and everyday people still struggle to answer a single question: Who is Jesus?
Why I Am a Christian: Leading Thinkers Explain Why They Believe

Why I Am a Christian: Leading Thinkers Explain Why They Believe
Publisher: Baker Books | ISBN: 080106712X | edition 2006 | PDF | 305 pages | 12,8 mb

Despite contributions from high-profile writers such as Ravi Zacharias, Josh McDowell and Peter Kreeft, this anthology adds nothing to the age-old genre of Christian apologetics. It opens with essays defending both truth and theism against postmodern atheists, and eventually moves to specifically Christian teachings: "Why I Believe the Bible Is the Word of God," "Why I Believe Jesus Is the Messiah and Son of God," and "Why I Have Chosen to Follow Christ." Some essays, such as J.P. Moreland's autobiographical discussion of his choice to follow Jesus, are stirring. Others are dull and predictable: Barry Leventhal (Southern Evangelical Seminary), for example, tediously rehearses the Old Testament prophecies that he believes Jesus fulfilled. As a collection, the book is unbalanced. There are, for instance, too many contributions from some writers; editor Geisler offers two essays, as does Liberty University's Gary Habermas. Given the abundance of Christian "leading thinkers," one wishes the editors had been a bit more imaginative and included a greater diversity of voices. Particularly troubling is the total absence of female contributors. In an era in which many women leave the evangelical churches for spiritual homes more friendly to feminism, this book would have been strengthened immeasurably by an essay or two by leading women thinkers explaining why they, too, believe. This disappointing collection of apologetic essays will send readers scurrying back to Cardinal Newman and other bolder, more invigorating defenses of the faith.
Why I Am a Christian: Leading Thinkers Explain Why They Believe

Why I Am a Christian: Leading Thinkers Explain Why They Believe
Publisher: Baker Books | ISBN: 080106712X | edition 2006 | PDF | 304 pages | 2,45 mb

Despite contributions from high-profile writers such as Ravi Zacharias, Josh McDowell and Peter Kreeft, this anthology adds nothing to the age-old genre of Christian apologetics. It opens with essays defending both truth and theism against postmodern atheists, and eventually moves to specifically Christian teachings: "Why I Believe the Bible Is the Word of God," "Why I Believe Jesus Is the Messiah and Son of God," and "Why I Have Chosen to Follow Christ." Some essays, such as J.P. Moreland's autobiographical discussion of his choice to follow Jesus, are stirring. Others are dull and predictable: Barry Leventhal (Southern Evangelical Seminary), for example, tediously rehearses the Old Testament prophecies that he believes Jesus fulfilled. As a collection, the book is unbalanced. There are, for instance, too many contributions from some writers; editor Geisler offers two essays, as does Liberty University's Gary Habermas. Given the abundance of Christian "leading thinkers," one wishes the editors had been a bit more imaginative and included a greater diversity of voices. Particularly troubling is the total absence of female contributors. In an era in which many women leave the evangelical churches for spiritual homes more friendly to feminism, this book would have been strengthened immeasurably by an essay or two by leading women thinkers explaining why they, too, believe. This disappointing collection of apologetic essays will send readers scurrying back to Cardinal Newman and other bolder, more invigorating defenses of the faith.