Big Questions in Ecology And Evolution

Big Questions in Ecology and Evolution [Repost]  

Posted by ChrisRedfield at Aug. 5, 2014
Big Questions in Ecology and Evolution [Repost]

Thomas N. Sherratt, ‎David M. Wilkinson - Big Questions in Ecology and Evolution
Published: 2009-04-25 | ISBN: 0199548609, 0199548617 | PDF | 336 pages | 3 MB

Big Questions in Ecology and Evolution (repost)  

Posted by fdts at June 2, 2013
Big Questions in Ecology and Evolution (repost)

Big Questions in Ecology and Evolution
by Thomas N. Sherratt, David M. Wilkinson
English | 2009 | ISBN: 0199548617 | 336 pages | PDF | 3.16 MB

Handbook of Meta-analysis in Ecology and Evolution  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by interes at May 9, 2016
Handbook of Meta-analysis in Ecology and Evolution

Handbook of Meta-analysis in Ecology and Evolution by Julia Koricheva and Jessica Gurevitch
English | 2013 | ISBN: 0691137285, 0691137293 | 520 pages | PDF | 3,2 MB
A Biologist's Guide to Mathematical Modeling in Ecology and Evolution (repost)

Sarah P. Otto, Troy Day, "A Biologist's Guide to Mathematical Modeling in Ecology and Evolution"
2007 | ISBN: 0691123446 | EPUB | 744 pages | 13 MB
Avian Invasions: The Ecology and Evolution of Exotic Birds (Oxford Avian Biology) by Julie L. Lockwood

Avian Invasions: The Ecology and Evolution of Exotic Birds (Oxford Avian Biology) by Julie L. Lockwood
English | Oct 4, 2009 | ISBN: 0199232555 | 316 Pages | PDF | 2 MB

Biological invaders represent one of the primary threats to the maintenance of global biodiversity, human health, and the success of human economic enterprises. The continuing globalization of our society ensures that the need to understand the process of biological invasion will only increase in the future. There is also a growing recognition that the study of biological invaders provides a unique insight into basic questions in ecology and evolution.
A Biologist's Guide to Mathematical Modeling in Ecology and Evolution [Repost]

A Biologist's Guide to Mathematical Modeling in Ecology and Evolution by Troy Day
Princeton University Press | March 12, 2007 | English | ISBN: 0691123446 | 744 pages | EPUB | 13 MB

Thirty years ago, biologists could get by with a rudimentary grasp of mathematics and modeling. Not so today. In seeking to answer fundamental questions about how biological systems function and change over time, the modern biologist is as likely to rely on sophisticated mathematical and computer-based models as traditional fieldwork.
An Introduction to Mathematical Models in Ecology and Evolution: Time and Space

An Introduction to Mathematical Models in Ecology and Evolution: Time and Space by Mike Gillman
Wiley-Blackwell; 2 edition | April 20, 2009 | English | ISBN: 140517515X | 168 pages | PDF | 3 MB

Students often find it difficult to grasp fundamental ecological and evolutionary concepts because of their inherently mathematical nature. Likewise, the application of ecological and evolutionary theory often requires a high degree of mathematical competence.
An Introduction to Mathematical Models in Ecology and Evolution: Time and Space, (2nd Edition) (Repost)

Mike Gillman, "An Introduction to Mathematical Models in Ecology and Evolution: Time and Space, (2nd Edition)"
English | 2009-07-07 | ISBN: 1405194898 | 167 pages | PDF | 2.1 mb
A Biologist's Guide to Mathematical Modeling in Ecology and Evolution

Sarah P. Otto, Troy Day, "A Biologist's Guide to Mathematical Modeling in Ecology and Evolution"
ISBN: 0691123446 | 2007 | EPUB | 744 pages | 13 MB

Animal Signals (Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution)  

Posted by FlameKylin303 at March 8, 2010
Animal Signals (Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution)

Animal Signals (Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution)
Publisher: Oxford University Press | 2004 | English | ISBN-10: 0198526857 | 176 Pages | PDF | 127 Mb

Why are animal signals reliable? This is the central problem for evolutionary biologists interested in signals. Of course, not all signals are reliable; but most are, otherwise receivers of signals would ignore them. A number of theoretical answers have been proposed and empirical studies made, but there still remains a considerable amount of confusion. The authors, one a theoretician the other a fieldworker, introduce a sense of order to this chaos. A significant cause of confusion has been the tendency for different researchers to use either the same term with different meanings, or different terms with the same meaning.