1990s Music

Modern Music and After, 3rd Edition  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by IrGens at Sept. 24, 2017
Modern Music and After, 3rd Edition

Modern Music and After, 3rd Edition by Paul Griffiths
English | February 16, 2011 | ISBN: 019974050X | EPUB | 373 pages | 6.8 MB
Berlin Calling: A Story of Anarchy, Music, The Wall, and the Birth of the New Berlin

Paul Hockenos, " Berlin Calling: A Story of Anarchy, Music, The Wall, and the Birth of the New Berlin"
ISBN: 162097195X | 2017 | EPUB | 260 pages | 25.14 MB
The Clientele - Music for the Age of Miracles (Deluxe Version) (2017)

The Clientele - Music for the Age of Miracles (Deluxe Version) (2017)
WEB FLAC (Tracks) - 365 MB | Cover | MP3 CBR 320 kbps - 127 MB | 00:54:33
Indie Rock, Dreampop | Label: Tapete Records

The Clientele return in September with Music for the Age of Miracles, their first release of new music since 2010's Minotaur EP and their first album on Tapete Records. After The Clientele released Minotaur, Alasdair MacLean, singer and principal songwriter for the band, made two wonderful albums with Lupe Nunez-Fernandez as Amor de Dias, issued a Clientele best-of called Alone and Unreal, oversaw reissues of Suburban Light and Strange Geometry, and played shows solo or as part of Amor de Dias or The Clientele. He and Lupe have also been raising a family, so the prospect of a new Clientele record seemed to be diminishing.
VA - Now That's What I Call the 1990s: The Alternative Pop Collection (2010)

VA - Now That's What I Call the 1990s: The Alternative Pop Collection (2010)
EAC Rip | FLAC (tracks+log+.cue) | 01:13:40 | 536 Mb
Pop Rock, Alternative Rock | Label: EMI Records

Now That’s What I Call the 1990s focuses on the decade’s second half, splitting its time between pop songs and the alternative music that followed in grunge’s footsteps. Pearl Jam and other hard-edged bands are absent from this compilation; instead, slicker groups like Live (“I Alone”) and Collective Soul (“Shine”) represent the wave of mainstream rock that swept through the Clinton era, with Everclear (“Father of Mine”) and Sublime (“What I Got”) thrown in for good measure. Des’ree’s “You Gotta Be” and New Radicals’ “You Get What You Give” help anchor the album’s pop side, while the inclusion of Edwin McCain’s “I’ll Be” is a reminder that the decade also spawned many an omnipresent wedding song. Ignoring grunge, Euro-dance, and teen pop makes this a narrow-minded compilation, but for those who like the aforementioned songs, Now That's What I Call the 1990s is an easy way to get them all in one place.
Democracy of Sound: Music Piracy and the Remaking of American Copyright in the Twentieth Century (Repost)

Alex Sayf Cummings, "Democracy of Sound: Music Piracy and the Remaking of American Copyright in the Twentieth Century"
2013 | pages: 272 | ISBN: 0199858225 | PDF | 2,2 mb

Songs from the Edge of Japan: Music-making in Yaeyama and Okinawa  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by First1 at Sept. 2, 2017
Songs from the Edge of Japan: Music-making in Yaeyama and Okinawa

Songs from the Edge of Japan: Music-making in Yaeyama and Okinawa by Matt Gillan
English | February 28th, 2012 | ASIN: B00AW99FUK, ISBN: 1409424049, 1138261246 | 241 pages | EPUB/PDF | 19.80 MB

Since the early 1990s, Okinawan music has experienced an extraordinary boom in popularity throughout Japan. Musicians from this island prefecture in the very south of Japan have found success as performers and recording artists, and have been featured in a number of hit films and television dramas.
VA - Until The End Of The World: Music From The Motion Picture Soundtrack (1991)

VA - Until The End Of The World: Music From The Motion Picture Soundtrack (1991)
EAC | FLAC (Tracks) + cue.+log ~ 389 Mb | Mp3, CBR320 kbps ~ 167 Mb
Label: Warner Bros. | # 9 26707-2 | 01:09:37 | Scans included
Soundtrack, Alternative Rock, College Rock, New Wave, Post-Punk, Pop/Rock

Until the End of the World is a definite contender for best motion picture soundtrack of the 1990s. With a lineup that includes Talking Heads, Lou Reed, R.E.M., Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, Depeche Mode, U2, and others all providing original songs or new covers, it's an absolute joy. Interspersed with Graeme Revell's haunting ambient score, virtually every pop/rock track works perfectly as part of a cohesive whole. "Sax and Violins," recorded during the dying days of Talking Heads, might be the band's most confident moment, as a jazzy background shuffle and keyboards provide compelling momentum underneath David Byrne's sarcastic vocals. Crime & the City Solution could have made an entire career out of the emotional yet existential "The Adversary." R.E.M. and Depeche Mode both contribute touching ballads. "Fretless" is one of the most beautiful tracks to be found in R.E.M.'s discography, documenting a wounded relationship with subtle grace. "Death's Door" is one of those sad numbers Depeche Mode fans have grown to love, with Martin Gore handling the vocals.
Franz Xaver Scharwenka - Piano Music Vol.4 - Seta Tanyel (2003) {Hyperion-Helios CDH55134 rec 1995}

Franz Xaver Scharwenka - Piano Music Vol.4 - Seta Tanyel (2003) {Hyperion-Helios CDH55134 rec 1995}
XLD rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 198 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 167 Mb
Full Artwork @ 300 dpi (png) -> 18 Mb | 5% repair rar
© 1995, 2003 Collins Classics / Hyperion Records / Helios | CDH55134
Classical / Romantic / Early 20th Century / Piano

'… brimful with alert character and beauty whilst the two piano pieces are delightful in their raucous melodies … briliantly done by Tanyel' (Classical Net Review). It was brave and useful and laudable of Seta Tanyel and the now-defunct label Collins Classics to have embarked, in the 1990s, in a thorough exploration of the music of Xaver Scharwenka (1850-1924), and one must be grateful to Hyperion to have reissued almost all of it. The 4-volume traversal of his solo piano music doesn't embrace I think Scharwenka's complete piano output, but it is still very substantial. Add to that the three first piano concertos (apparently Collins didn't live long enough to record the Fourth, and the first is the one disc that Hyperion did not reissue, Piano Concerto 1, obviously because they already had another one in their catalog, Rubinstein: Piano Concerto No. 4; Scharwenka: Piano Concerto No. 1) and what I think was the complete chamber music. However, I didn't always feel that the results lived up to the project's promises.
John Barry - Chaplin: Music from the Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (1992)

John Barry - Chaplin: Music from the Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (1992)
EAC | FLAC (Tracks) + cue.+log ~ 214 Mb | Mp3, CBR320 kbps ~ 116 Mb | Artwork included
Soundtrack, Score | Label: Epic Soundtrax | # EPC 472602 2 | 00:49:33

Even though it relies heavily on film scorer John Barry's by-now formulaic (if no less effective) methodology of fusing his distinctively luxuriant string arrangements with the music of whatever time or locale the score sets out to evoke (in this case, largely the Hollywood of the 1910s and '20s), the composer triumphed once again, garnering his second Academy Award nomination of the 1990s. Perhaps because of the years he spent dues-paying with English pop and jazz combos, Barry gets inside this period jazz and ragtime with both enthusiasm and, more importantly, taste, recalling similar effective efforts on Francis Coppola's The Cotton Club.

The Hatred of Music  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by tarantoga at Jan. 24, 2017
The Hatred of Music

Pascal Quignard, "The Hatred of Music (The Margellos World Republic of Letters)"
ISBN: 0300211384 | 2016 | EPUB | 216 pages | 3 MB